Barb Jungr – Just Like a Woman [Hymn to Nina] (2008)

Barb Jungr – Just Like a Woman [Hymn to Nina] (2008)

Genre: Jazz Vocal | MP3 320 kbps | 123 MB | 53 min.

‘Just Like A Woman’ is Barb Jungr’s hymn to the late, great Nina Simone. This beautiful album combines Barb’s compelling arrangements and resolute delivery to bring a fresh perspective on songs associated with her heroine Nina Simone. Barb Jungr proves she is a peerless interpreter and makes these wonderful songs her own, drawing subtle qualities from the lyrics with a moving lightness of touch to make their message utterly contemporary. Barb is perhaps most famous for her re-workings of Bob Dylan songs and has included: ‘Ballad Of Hollis Brown’, ‘The Times They Are A Changing’ and a soul-meets-reggae influenced ‘Just Like A Woman’. Barb has surrounded herself with some of the UK’s finest musicians including Danny Thompson on bass and Mark Lockheart on saxophone and clarinets.

Track Listings
01. Black is the Colour / Break down and let it all out
02. Just like a woman
03. Lilac wine
04. The times they are a changing
05. Angel of the morning
06. Don t let me be misunderstood
07. Keeper of the flame
08. To love somebody
09. One morning in May / The pusher
10. Ballad of Hollis Brown
11. Feeling good

Produced by calum malcolm with barb jungr
barb jungr – vocals and backing vocals
jenny carr – musical director, piano and backing vocals
jessica lauren – organ, harmonicas, mbira, autoharp, mellotron, electronic tanpura and backing vocals
johnny lee – percussion, drums, clock sample
danny thompson – bass
mark lockheart – saxophones and clarinets

Barb Jungr’s new CD features her versions of songs originally recorded by Nina Simone. Needless to say, although the album is intended as a tribute to her heroine, Jungr puts her own stamp on each song, and each is transmitted through her sensitivity and craft. There are no slavish reproductions either of Simone’s interpretations or arrangements here, but rather shining original versions.
I believe that the sequence of seven songs from Angel of the Morning through to Hollis Brown may be the finest thing that Jungr has recorded. These are songs about lost love, unhappiness, yearning, wanting more and being prepared to settle for less, tears, regret, loss and death, yet the whole thing is done with such a delicate intelligence and such a depth of understanding that we begin to think that there may be something in the concept of catharsis – or perhaps we can simply sit back and enjoy wonderful songs sung by someone who knows what she is about and can show us things about the songs which we would never have thought of ourselves. The musicians here underpin and punctuate the words throughout the album with nuances and subtleties while Jenny Carr’s piano weaves a filigree of silver wire around that lovely, pellucid voice.
Of the three Bob Dylan songs which appear, Just Like A Woman and The Times They Are A-changin’ seem almost jaunty in these arrangements, but the Ballad Of Hollis Brown is more satisfactorily dark. Elsewhere on the album, the sleevenotes suggest that the tree in Lilac Wine grows in a graveyard. It seems a reasonable conclusion. I would go further and say that the cemetery itself is situated on the junction of Desolation Row and Lonely Street – and those of us who know Barb Jungr’s Heartbreak Hotel will be aware of just what kind of place that must be.
It occurs to me, of course, that all this harping on darkness and misery is not perhaps the best way to persuade you that this would be a good thing to buy with one click. Fair enough, but if it’s unremitting cheerfulness you’re after you probably won’t have read this far anyway. Be reassured that in the final track all the emotion which singer and band have kept under control is allowed to burst out in an expression of joy in life and living. Buy this one.
:~ Eric Blair(sic)

Nina Simone embraced utterly louis armstrong’s understanding of music: “what we play is life” and, “my whole life, my whole soul, my whole spirit is to blow that horn.” Nina sang and played with everything she had, and she took songs and inspiration from everything in her life and world. this was both her strength and her weakness, for that full commitment, that passion, is too strong a flavour for those of faint heart.

i grew up loving Nina Simone; that uncategorisable voice, her uncompromising approach to material, fearlessness in changing lyric and arrangement to make songs personal, and courageous musicianship. so when i heard her spirit speak demanding that i make a collection dedicated to her, i complied without question. this is my ‘hymn to Nina’. barb jungr january 2008

black is the color of my true love’s hair
the water flows to the sea, and when we stand beside that mighty river, it’s easy to cry for all that lost love and time, easy to break down and let it all out.

just like a woman
it’s just like bob dylan to write a song as beautiful as this.

lilac wine
there’s a unique and near perfect relationship between lovelessness and drink that only the abandoned truly understand. and in this song there’s also a supernatural aspect, that lilac tree is surely in a graveyard, the lilac flowers hanging over the lichen-covered stones as the clock of time ticks slowly, endlessly on.

the times they are a-changin’
this song is as perfect today as it was when it was written, the sense for Nina of those changing times may have been different, but every word of this rings true, right here, right now.

angel of the morning
this song is the reverse of ‘maggie may’, indeed it might be her song. such a simple song, with so much quiet depth.

don’t let me be misunderstood
“i have thoughts like every other one”, a very dark, dark song, velvet… and bloodstained.

keeper of the flame
“when the fire is burning out and the angels call my name” i may still be singing this beautiful and true torch song.

to love somebody
the gibb brothers have written some stunning songs, and this has always been one of my favourites.

one morning in may / the pusher
these songs had to go together, and the pusher became a hymn all of its own suddenly, and it is about so much more than drugs.

ballad of hollis brown
why would a man kill all of his family and turn a gun on himself? as always dylan reveals the reason by simply telling the story.

feeling good
“it’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s a new life”. this is my 6th recording for linn records, but it feels like the first, somehow. “and i’m feeling good”.

:~ Liner Notes

The Sunday Times, 09 March 2008 4 stars
After deconstructing Elvis, Dylan and Jacques Brel, the British singer pays homage to Nina Simone. Jungr being Jungr, nothing follows a conventional path in this oblique collection, which veers between gospel, folk, R&B and discreet jazz. She doesn’t go for obvious covers or try to compete with Simone’s idiosyncratic delivery – her voice is lighter and almost girlish. The real pleasure lies in the typically thoughtful juxtapositions of material. The bleak sentiments of The Pusher sit side by side with the pastoral cadences of One Morning in May, while Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood is unashamedly dark. Fans will be pleased that the Dylan quota remains high. Clive Davis

The Independent, 07 March 2008 4 stars
A vocal stylist acclaimed for her interpretations of Jacques Brel and Bob Dylan, Barb Jungr here turns her attention to Nina Simone, with an album drawn from the late pianist’s repertoire. The most striking pieces may be the medleys with which Jungr brings a trad-folk tone to. Particularly the seamless segueing of One Morning in May with the old Steppenwolf drug song The Pusher. Oddly for a Dylan specialist, her reggae-styled Just Like a Woman grates inappropriately, though her Ballad of Hollis Brown, with the delicate madness of the piano part evoking the protagonist’s descent into despair, is much more effective. It’s all brought to a close with a rousing, exultant blues arrangement of Feeling Good that pays true homage to Nina’s feisty spirit.

Andy Gill

in: http://freebooksource.com/?p=9186

Antony and The Johnsons e Nina Simone

legendI musicisti che agiscono per la via del sentimento si dividono in due gruppi:
Nina Simone e tutti gli altri.

Fra tutti gli altri Antony si fa notare:

Antony and the Johnsons, I Am a Bird Now 

Barb Jungr, Just Like a Woman – Hymn to Nina

Barb Jungr

Just Like a Woman – Hymn to Nina

barb jungr – vocals and backing vocals
jenny carr – musical director, piano and backing vocals
jessica lauren – organ, harmonicas, mbira, autoharp, mellotron, electronic tanpura and backing vocals
johnny lee – percussion, drums, clock sample
danny thompson – bass
mark lockheart – saxophones and clarinets

recorded at the livingston studios on the 19th-21st november 2007
engineered by calum malcolm, assisted by sonny
mixed by calum malcolm at carlekemp studios, north berwick, uk
photography by steve ullathorne
design by the art surgery

Nina Simone embraced utterly louis armstrong’s understanding of music: “what we play is life” and, “my whole life, my whole soul, my whole spirit is to blow that horn.” Nina sang and played with everything she had, and she took songs and inspiration from everything in her life and world. this was both her strength and her weakness, for that full commitment, that passion, is too strong a flavour for those of faint heart.

i grew up loving Nina Simone; that uncategorisable voice, her uncompromising approach to material, fearlessness in changing lyric and arrangement to make songs personal, and courageous musicianship. so when i heard her spirit speak demanding that i make a collection dedicated to her, i complied without question. this is my ‘hymn to Nina’. barb jungr january 2008
black is the color of my true love’s hair
the water flows to the sea, and when we stand beside that mighty river, it’s easy to cry for all that lost love and time, easy to break down and let it all out.

just like a woman
it’s just like bob dylan to write a song as beautiful as this.

lilac wine

there’s a unique and near perfect relationship between lovelessness and drink that only the abandoned truly understand. and in this song there’s also a supernatural aspect, that lilac tree is surely in a graveyard, the lilac flowers hanging over the lichen-covered stones as the clock of time ticks slowly, endlessly on.

the times they are a-changin’
this song is as perfect today as it was when it was written, the sense for Nina of those changing times may have been different, but every word of this rings true, right here, right now.

angel of the morning

this song is the reverse of ‘maggie may’, indeed it might be her song. such a simple song, with so much quiet depth.

don’t let me be misunderstood

“i have thoughts like every other one”, a very dark, dark song, velvet… and bloodstained.

keeper of the flame
“when the fire is burning out and the angels call my name” i may still be singing this beautiful and true torch song.

to love somebody

the gibb brothers have written some stunning songs, and this has always been one of my favourites.

one morning in may / the pusher

these songs had to go together, and the pusher became a hymn all of its own suddenly, and it is about so much more than drugs.

ballad of hollis brown
why would a man kill all of his family and turn a gun on himself? as always dylan reveals the reason by simply telling the story.

feeling good
“it’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s a new life”. this is my 6th recording for linn records, but it feels like the first, somehow. “and i’m feeling good”.

all tracks arranged by barb jungr with jenny carr and jessica lauren
all songs previously recorded by Nina Simone

Segnalato da Ruckert

Grazie

A daughter’s tribute.

When Lisa Celeste Kelly, who performs under the stage name Simone, told her mother, internationally known vocalist and pianist Nina Simone, that she wanted to follow the same artistic path, ”Mommy” was not pleased.Simone suspects there might have been some jealousy involved and perhaps a touch of the insecurity that tends to afflict the artistic. ”Mommy,” as Simone still refers to her mother, might also have been trying to protect her only daughter from the same kind of indignities she suffered — Nina Simone, who died in 2003, believed the recording industry took unfair advantage of her and her talents.But at these moments of potential conflict, the daughter reassured her mother. ”I always told her that she was the gateway through which I would walk to achieve my superstardom. At the time, I had no idea how true that would be,” says Simone , who now lives near Stroudsburg.On Saturday, on the second day of the VF Outlet Berks Jazz Festival, Simone’s artistic connection with her mother takes an important turn. In the intimate setting of Gerald Veasley’s Jazz Bass, a 110-seat club in the Sheraton Reading Hotel, she will perform many of the tunes associated with her mother in what will be her first public performance with a big band. Whitehall Township resident Rob Stoneback, the trombonist and composer, leads the 17-piece group, which includes many Lehigh Valley musicians.In May, Simone will release her debut recording, ”Simone on Simone,” which explores her mother’s legacy and Simone’s interpretation of it. Grammy Award-winner Bob Belden produced the CD, which was recorded at Star City, a Bethlehem Township recording studio.

A slightly smaller seven-piece group, with Stoneback as musical director and including some of the same Lehigh Valley musicians, will also tour with Simone, promoting the recording. Stops include the JVC Jazz Festival and Colorado‘s Telluride Jazz Festival, both in June, as well as dates in Chicago.

Simone is no stranger to performing. She sang the lead in Broadway’s ”Aida” and appeared in ”Rent.” For the last 18 months, she has performed her mother’s music in selected concerts, including Philadelphia‘s World Cafe, Manhattan’s Town Hall and the Deer Head Inn in Delaware Water Gap.

Still, the CD release and the performances supporting it mark an important step for Simone, who wants to honor her roots and her mother’s accomplishments before she pursues other music in her career.

”Sometimes, I felt like I made the mistake of growing up,” Simone says recently by telephone from her Poconos-area home. ”As I got older, I would sometimes use my ‘little girl’ voice and Mommy always responded in a caring, nurturing way. But as I became a woman, in my opinion, she couldn’t help but think I was trying to compete with her. It took me a few times, but I had to tell her that I revered her, and how much of a fan I was of her music, and that I was simply trying to carry on the legacy.”

A turning point in the mother-daughter relationship occurred when the pair worked informally in a Chicago studio in 1999, when Simone was visiting her mother.

”I proceeded to give her all my favorite Nina Simone songs,” says Simone. ”We sat down and sang together and shared that time. Then we did ‘Music For Lovers’ and she was so surprised. She was so moved by how I did that song that she invited me to sing that song with her [in performance]. Who was I to decline?”

The first cut on her debut CD is a duet featuring mother and daughter, recorded in 1999 in Dublin where they sang ”Music For Lovers,” a tune strongly associated with Nina Simone’s career.

By her own admission, Simone is entering the musical game a little late. At 45, she is at least two decades beyond the 20-something age record companies prefer to promote. She also spent more than 10 years in the Air Force, serving mostly in Germany, where she worked as a civil engineer.

As the only child, Simone also had responsibilities for her mother’s care near the end of her life, responsibilities that also delayed her own career.

”I’m a prolific songwriter. I’ve been writing for 17 years,” says Simone. ”But one of the things that God has taught me is patience. I’ve been trying to get my first CD out for a while. The last time, it was very close to happening, but I had to choose between my duty or my dream. In that case, duty came first.”

During her care for her mother, in the final years of her life, that another critical event occurred. On a visit to her mother’s California condominium, her mother gave Simone 50 arrangements of music Nina Simone had recorded and performed.

”When we get to a certain age, we realize we’re not going to live forever and we start preparing,” Simone says. ”One day, she just opened up a closet in the condo and viola , there they were. I’m just glad they were there and she gave them to me. After she died, everything became clear.”

In honoring her mother’s legacy, Simone taps into a rich reservoir of interest. In the years since her death, Nina Simone remains a cultural icon, with a devoted following, especially in the New York City area and in parts of Europe. Several high-profile Hollywood films have used her music, and contemporary musicians, including Jeff Buckley (”If I Knew”) and Feist (”Sea Lion Woman”) have covered her material.

Nina Simone was also very outspoken and, at times, controversial.

During the turbulent 1960s, she supported the civil rights movement and wrote one of her most impassioned pieces, ” Mississippi Goddam!” following the 1963 murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers and the deaths of four black school children in Alabama that same year.

”After she recorded ‘Mississippi Goddam!’ she started speaking out from the stage to support the civil rights movement and her people,” says Simone. ”When those four little girls were blown up, mommy told me she just lost it. People were not cursing on records at that time and, of all things, they weren’t including the word ‘God’ with the word ‘damn’ if they did. She was going against the grain. After that, she recorded ‘Old Jim Crow’ and ‘Four Women’ and ‘ Turning Point‘ and ‘Young, Gifted and Black.’ She found her niche, and she merged the world of music with, I don’t want to say politics, but I guess the civil rights movement. She believed she was able to speak out and make a difference.”

Disgusted with race relations in the country and the Vietnam War, Nina Simone left the United States in 1969, living in Liberia, the Barbados, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium and the United Kingdom. She eventually returned to the U.S., but was briefly arrested for not paying income taxes, her protest against U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

Stoneback, Simone’s musical director, who worked Nina Simone’s arrangements, said some were complete and others were sketches. Stoneback’s tenor saxophonist, Ken Moyer, arranged the music for both Stoneback’s big band and his smaller ensemble.

The original arrangements included tunes associated with Nina Simone’s career, including ”Black Is the Color Of My True Love’s Hair,” and ”Feeling Good,” which both appear on the new recording.

Laura Fedele, Independlently Blue, Le canzoni di Nina Simone Live

LAURA FEDELE IN TRIO
INDEPENDENTLY BLUE: le canzoni di Nina Simone
Laura Fedele
Stefano Dall’Ora
Marco Castiglioni

www.auditoriumedizioni.it

Ciò che mi ha attrae e mi spinge ad esplorare il mondo di Nina è soprattutto l’eterogeneità, oltre che la bellezza, del repertorio che la cantante pianista ha scelto di abbracciare nel corso della sua carriera. Mi entusiasmano le sue scelte stilistiche così particolari, equel pizzico di “follia” con cui lei passava dallo swing a Breil, dal gospel alle canzoni “leggere”, da Gershwin a Weill. Senza porsi limiti di sorta, lasciando via libera alla fantasia e alla curiosità di esplorare generi diversi. E io, che vedo le restrizioni puristiche come un paio di scarpe troppo strette, non posso che condividere questo percorso artistico. In particolare, amo le atmofere ipnotiche che Nina sapeva creare, con quegli arrangiamenti ritmici ed essenziali che, in fondo, erano un po’ il suo marchio di fabbrica.
“Mississipi Goddam”, “Lilac wine”, “See-line woman”, sono alcuni dei brani che ho scelto. Oltre, naturalmente, a “Four women”, da sempre nel mio repertorio.

Le recensioni per Indipendently blue, le canzoni di Nina Simone

Buscadero, maggio 2005

Gianni del Savio

Registrato dal vivo nell’ottobre del 2004 all’Auditorium Demetrio Stratos di Radio Popolare, l’album, come recita il sottotitolo – Le canzoni di Nina Simone – è un ispirato tributo alla grande artista afroamericana. Laura Fedele (piano e voce) è riuscita nel difficile intento di dare un pregevole tocco personale a brani noti o meno – alcuni standard, altri scritti dalla stessa Simone – evitando la facile via della pedissequa cover che rimane su binari già percorsi. Alcuni sono brani difficili, con possibili confronti da far tremare le gambe, ma lei sa come utilizzarne l’essenza e li modella a modo suo, virandoli spesso verso il jaz, jazz-blues e relative sfumature e improvvisazioni, forte di duttilità vocale e strumentale, con classe e capacità comunicativa. Impeccabili anche Stefano Dall’Ora (contrabbasso) e Marco Castiglioni (batteria), nel creare sonorità adeguate alle varie esigenze espressive: toni intimisti, drammatici, gioiosi, descrittivi.

Inizia con uno degli standard simoniani più impegnati, Mississippi Goddam, scritto sotto la bruciante cronaca dell’assassinio, nel ’63, di quattro bimbe in una chiesa (bomba, signori!) in Alabama, e quello di un militante dei diritti civili in Mississippi. Laura maniene l’accelerazione originale (velocità esecutiva dettata forse anche dalla necessità di scaricare di getto la rabbia), dando grande prova della capacità rielaborativa di materia difficile.

Poi nella più articolata Lilac Wine (e in Wild Is The Wind), ispirata anche alla versione di Jeff Buckley, la Fedele mette in piena luce la bellezza della sua voce e dell’essenzialità pianistica, mentre nell’intenso Backlash Blues (scritto dalla Simone insieme al grande poeta Langston Hughes), risaltano anche i colori più intensi del basso e la misura della batteria che, soprattutto nella seconda parte, offrono begli sganciamenti dagli schemi originari.

Altro tema forte è Four Women (ritratto orgoglioso di quattro diverse figure femminili nere) e il clima sonoro si fa meditato, intenso, intimista, attendamente descrittivo (ancora benissimo contrabbasso, batteria e piano anche nel lungo intermesso strumentale), con finale in ascesa anche drammatica, tensione che non caratterizza lo scintillante swing dello standard Love Me Or Leave Me. Eric Burdon s’innamorò di Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (portandoselo dietro per anni) e se l’originale è praticamente inarrivabile, Laura ne fa un’eccellente versione con bella e articolata dinamica vocale, chiudendo il concerto con Just Like e Woman – una delle tante appropiazioni autorali di rango della Simone – forte anche di una brillante linea pianistica, che offre un’ulteriore chiave di lettura al grande tema di Dylan. Un credito non da poco, nella carriera della Fedele.

Laura Fedele
Independently Blue, Le canzoni di Nina Simone
Auditorium

Sentito omaggio a Nina Simone da parte della jazz singer genovese

È stato registrato lo scorso autunno presso l’Auditorium Demetrio Stratos di Radio Popolare a Milano il primo cd live di Laura Fedele. La brava jazz singer genovese, che di recente si era cimentata in un progetto (Pornoshop) ispirato all’arte di Tom Waits, propone un altro caloroso tributo. Questa volta, il soggetto è un’autentica regina della musica, la favolosa Nina Simone, scomparsa in Francia poco più di due anni fa, il 21 aprile 2003.

“Dei numerosi talenti di Nina Simone” ha dichiarato Laura “ho sempre ammirato, se non addirittura invidiato, la formidabile versatilità. La sua capacità di calarsi in mondi musicali diversi, di suonare stili spesso lontani tra loro, mi ha sempre intrigato. Anche perché anch’io, nel mio piccolo, sono rimasta affascinata da cose diverse nel corso della mia carriera e ho sempre detestato l’idea di rimanere confinata in un unico ambito”.

Sono nove le canzoni del variegato repertorio della Simone che Laura ripropone nella classica, minimalista versione del trio piano, contrabbasso (Stefano Dall’Ora), batteria (Marco Castiglioni). Alcune delle quali non propriamente strafamose come la coinvolgente Backlash Blues che Laura interpreta con convinzione ed eccellente pertinenza stilistica.

E se, con un’inevitabile menzione per Jeff Buckley, non può mancare un’accorata cover di Lilac Wine, altrettanto si può dire di My Baby Just Cares For Me, uno dei cavalli di battaglia della cantante della North Carolina. Piace molto Laura nell’interpretazione elegante di Four Women e in quella altrettanto efficace di Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, davvero riuscitissima e piena di blues.

Chiude il lavoro una bella versione di Just Like A Woman, intelligente omaggio a tutte le donne in musica.

Ezio Guaitamacchi

Nina Simone, Concerto tributo, Pesaro 3 Settembre 2005

Provincia di Pesaro e Urbino dal 19 agosto al 29 settembre 2005

Sabato 3 settembre, Pennabilli

NINA SIMONE

Da ragazza, rivela attitudine e passione per il piano classico, talento che poi riversa nella black music (e non solo), mostrando, anche nella scelta del nome, di voler sfuggire a ogni etichettatura. Orgogliosa di essere nera, con Young, Gifted and Black, canzone scritta in tributo a una drammaturga e militante afroamericana, Nina Simone delinea le proprie qualità di donna e interprete. Problematica e viscerale, quanto determinata e impegnata nelle rivendicazioni femminili, civili e razziali, esprime un¹arte interpretativa complessa e affascinante: dotata di voce particolare, maestrìa pianistica e originalità compositiva, rimodella stilisticamente qualsiasi repertorio jazz, blues, gospel, folk, pop e rock.

Gianni Del Savio

ore 17.00 – Cinema Gambrinus IL FILM Wattstax, di Mel Stuart, 1973 (in inglese)

Introduzione di Gianni Del Savio

ore 18.30 – Centro storico IL CONCERTO DEL POMERIGGIO

Blues Company in concerto

ore 21.30 – Teatro Vittoria L’INCONTRO

Gianni Del Savio presenta NINA SIMONE

Gli ospiti Guido Giazzi (giornalista, direttore della rivista “Vinilmania”) e Laura Fedele (musicista)

Voce recitante Lucia Bianchi

ore 23.15 – Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II IL CONCERTO TRIBUTO

Laura Fedele in concerto Nina Simone Tribute

con Laura Fedele (voce)

Marco Castiglioni (batteria)

Stefano Dall’Ora (contrabbasso)

Dal pomeriggio, nel centro storico, mostre mercato e stands eno-gastronomici

In collaborazione con Comune di Pennabilli, Pennabilli Chiama e le Associazioni Giovanili del Territorio